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Author Topic: Bahai Values And Morals.  (Read 11302 times)

TonyC.

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Bahai Values And Morals.
« on: January 02, 2008, 04:57:48 PM »

If the Bahai have CLEAR  positions on sex, lying, drugs, and lesbian relationships I’d be interested in hearing them. Also if there is anything the Bahai consider sinful, immoral, or unholy in the eyes of God.
« Last Edit: March 02, 2008, 09:14:03 PM by TonyC. »
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omar

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Re: Bahai Values And Morals.
« Reply #1 on: January 04, 2008, 08:24:28 PM »

My friend was it considered the poor woman may have reached to the faith for the very moral concerns you mentioned? God is the whisperer that tells the right from wrong. She does these sins knowing God is frowning.  This is the time spiritual guidance is helpful. Did you offer it? She will receive no guidance with the Bahai. Only spiritual confusion and darkness. They talk not to God they read prayers. There is no listening for answers when he speaks. Their teachings are plagiarized out of context from many religions with much hypocrisy. If one does not like one set of answers, another is easy to find. As there is no sin repentance and change is unnecessary. You will not find an opinion here. They will refer to what writing suits them.
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bobbidupre

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Re: Bahai Values And Morals.
« Reply #2 on: January 06, 2008, 10:48:12 AM »

If you really want to know, Bahais believe that independant investigation of truth is fundamental to a seeker of knowledge. I suggest you begin the journey with www.bahai.org and follow your interests. The Bahai Faith is open to all.
Another great site is http://www.planetbahai.org or even www.Beliefnet.org.
Bahais are taught to seek, not necessaritly follow blindly, BUT the Bahai scriptures are very specific as to guidance regarding laws, morals and ethics. How each of us adhere to these Writings is between ourselves and our Creator-the final judge.
Bobbi Dupre
Encinitas Bahai Community
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omar

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Re: Bahai Values And Morals.
« Reply #3 on: January 07, 2008, 02:30:00 PM »

My friend did you not believe me your answers are not here? The discussion forum was not created for discussion. They will not discuss these things and the readings you were directed to will only mislead you. Was not the woman you spoke of as a frequent liar and one who professes there to be nothing unclean or immoral about a lesbian relationship a member and representative of the faith when you became involved with her? Did she receive the counsel for her immorality and hypocrisy to the sacred writings from her Bahai family! Believe what you saw and participated in not what you might read. Repent your own sin for laying with this kind of unclean woman outside of marriage so long. Rejoice she was not able to drag you further down the path of darkness. I will not come here to help you again.
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UDRF

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Re: Bahai Values And Morals.
« Reply #4 on: January 19, 2008, 12:25:20 PM »

Hi Tony

Thank you for turning to the Bahá'ís for answers concerning the unfortunate behavior of your girlfriend. Most would perhaps take her actions as an upfront judgment of the Bahá'í faith. I'll venture to say that your inquiries here are a perfect example of independent search for truth. I'm sorry that you haven't received many replies but I'm willing to answer to the best of my capabilities any questions you might have about the Bahá'í faith.

O SON OF SPIRIT! The best beloved of all things in My sight is Justice; turn not away therefrom if thou desirest Me, and neglect it not that I may confide in thee. By its aid thou shalt see with thine own eyes and not through the eyes of others, and shalt know of thine own knowledge and not through the knowledge of thy neighbor. Ponder this in thy heart; how it behooveth thee to be. Verily justice is My gift to thee and the sign of My loving-kindness. Set it then before thine eyes.
Bahá'u'lláh

Firstly, the Bahá'í faith has very strong moral guidance concerning, among other things, sexual behavior and homosexuality. Bahá'ís are required to maintain abstinence from sexual activities before marriage and marriage is considered a holy union between man and woman. Sex between members of the same sex is forbidden.

These laws are not optional. However, there is an awareness among Bahá'ís that not everybody is at the same stage of spiritual maturity and that the best way to influence someone to follow the laws of the Bahá'í faith is by being oneself an example of bahá'í principles and simply by showing ones love of the Bahá'í faith by ones actions. One of the greatest tests for Bahá'ís, however, is realizing that other Bahá'ís are only human and that we're all trying our best.

There is an institutional recourse when a Bahá'í is continually and blatantly goes against the laws of the faith but this is usually a last resort. This recourse consists of depriving a person  of their administrative rights which consist in the right to vote (There are no priests in the Bahá'í faith. It's administrative bodies, called spiritual assemblies, are democratically elected) and to participate in it's administrative functions. This is considered very serious in the Bahá'í faith and is, as I mentioned, only a last recourse.

O SON OF JUSTICE!
Whither can a lover go but to the land of his beloved? and what seeker findeth rest away from his heart's desire? To the true lover reunion is life, and separation is death. His breast is void of patience and his heart hath no peace. A myriad lives he would forsake to hasten to the abode of his beloved.
Baha'u'llah

Concerning truthfulness: "Truthfulness is the foundation of all the virtues of the world of humanity. Without truthfulness, progress and success in all of the worlds of God are impossible for a soul. When this holy attribute is established in man, all the divine qualities will also become realized."
Bahá'í writings


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UDRF

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Re: Bahai Values And Morals.
« Reply #5 on: January 19, 2008, 12:47:15 PM »

Cont.

Drugs and alcohol are completely forbidden in the Bahá'í faith.

O FRIENDS!
Abandon not the everlasting beauty for a beauty that must die, and set not your affections on this mortal world of dust.
Baha'u'llah

The Bahá'í faith has a very high standard of moral conduct:

A chaste and holy life must be made the controlling principle in the behavior and conduct of all Bahá'ís, both in their social relations with the members of their own community, and in their contact with the world at large. It must  30  adorn and reinforce the ceaseless labors and meritorious exertions of those whose enviable position is to propagate the Message, and to administer the affairs, of the Faith of Bahá'u'lláh. It must be upheld, in all its integrity and implications, in every phase of the life of those who fill the ranks of that Faith, whether in their homes, their travels, their clubs, their societies, their entertainments, their schools, and their universities. It must be accorded special consideration in the conduct of the social activities of every Bahá'í summer school and any other occasions on which Bahá'í community life is organized and fostered. It must be closely and continually identified with the mission of the Bahá'í youth, both as an element in the life of the Bahá'í community, and as a factor in the future progress and orientation of the youth of their own country.

Such a chaste and holy life, with its implications of modesty, purity, temperance, decency, and clean-mindedness, involves no less than the exercise of moderation in all that pertains to dress, language, amusements, and all artistic and literary avocations. It demands daily vigilance in the control of one's carnal desires and corrupt inclinations. It calls for the abandonment of a frivolous conduct, with its excessive attachment to trivial and often misdirected pleasures. It requires total abstinence from all alcoholic drinks, from opium, and from similar habit-forming drugs. It condemns the prostitution of art and of literature, the practices of nudism and of companionate marriage, infidelity in marital relationships, and all manner of promiscuity, of easy familiarity, and of sexual vices. It can tolerate no compromise with the theories, the standards, the habits, and the excesses of a decadent age. Nay rather it seeks to demonstrate, through the dynamic force of its example, the pernicious character of such theories, the falsity of such standards, the hollowness of such claims, the perversity of such habits, and the sacrilegious character of such excesses.
Shoghi Effendi - Guardian of the Bahá'í faith


It is necessary to point out that many of the moral imperatives stated above must necessarily be a matter between the conscience of the individual and God.



 
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UDRF

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Re: Bahai Values And Morals.
« Reply #6 on: January 19, 2008, 01:06:28 PM »

cont.

Having discussed or rather addressed the issue of the moral responsibilities of Bahá'ís it is furthermore important to state that no Bahá'í has the authority or permission to judge other Bahá'ís or non-Bahá'ís. This unfortunate responsibility, as stated before, sometimes falls into the hands of a spiritual assembly but it is the assembly as a body which addresses the issue and not it's members. Consider these quotes:

O SON OF DUST!
Verily I say unto thee: Of all men the most negligent is he that disputeth idly and seeketh to advance himself over his brother. Say, O brethren! Let deeds, not words, be your adorning.

O CHILDREN OF MEN! Know ye not why We created you all from the same dust? That no one should exalt himself over the other. Ponder at all times in your hearts how ye were created. Since We have created you all from one same substance it is incumbent on you to be even as one soul, to walk with the same feet, eat with the same mouth and dwell in the same land, that from your inmost being, by your deeds and actions, the signs of oneness and the essence of detachment may be made manifest. Such is My counsel to you, O concourse of light! Heed ye this counsel that ye may obtain the fruit of holiness from the tree of wondrous glory.

"That seeker should, also, regard backbiting as grievous error, and keep himself aloof from its dominion, inasmuch as backbiting quencheth the light of the heart, and extinguisheth the life of the soul."
Baha'u'llah

I hope this answers some of your questions. The forum on myspace you posted on is also a very good place to ask questions since it has a pretty active group of people using it.

Best regards,
Jakob

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Rebecca

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Re: Bahai Values And Morals.
« Reply #7 on: January 22, 2008, 08:57:59 PM »

Hi Tony  :)

The Founder of the Bahá'í Faith, Bahá'u'lláh, declared that he was the "Promised One" of all the religions of God, fulfilling prophecies that can be found in these religions.  We believe that He was the most recent Manifestation of God, and that he received Revelation from God that we should read and study daily in order to find guidance.

Bahá'u'lláh lived among us from November 12, 1817 - May 29, 1892, which is recent enough so that we have eye witness descriptions of His character and of what it was like to be in the same room with Bahá'u'lláh when He received Divine Revelation.  I could post such a description later, should you be interested.

Believing as we do that we have the actual Word of God to guide us, I think it goes without saying that we refer to it all the time when discussing religious concepts, quote from it and draw our guidance from it.  We also have secondary sources, of course; you will see that I draw heavily on one of them below.


You ask about "institutional recourse".  "Recourse" is really a last resort.  While they have the solemn and sacred duty to uphold the laws of the Bahá'í Faith, our elected institutions --- the Local Spiritual Assemblies --- "must, at the same time, temper their actions with love. Bahá'u'lláh counseled that 'One must guide mankind to the ocean of true understanding in a spirit of love and tolerance' " (quoted from Developing Distinctive Bahá'í Communities: Guidelines for Spiritual Assemblies, by the National Spiritual Assembly of the Baha'is of the United States)

"The principal motive is not to condemn and punish the individual but to assist him, if necessary, to bring his behavior into conformity with the Teachings and also to protect the community."  (Id., quoting a letter of the Universal House of Justice)

Contrasting the role of an individual in trying to help another, guidance provided by the Universal House of Justice states,

"It should be realized that there is a distinction drawn in the Faith between the attitudes which should characterize individuals in their relationship to other people, namely, loving forgiveness, forbearance, and concern with one's own sins, not the sins of others, and those attitudes which should be shown by the Spiritual Assemblies, whose duty is to administer the law of God with justice."  (Id., quoting a letter of the Universal House of Justice)

On forbearance and concern with one's own sins (not the sins of others), even the Bible says, at Matthew 7:3-4:

"Why do you look at the speck of sawdust in your brother's eye and pay no attention to the plank in your own eye?  How can you say to your brother, 'Let me take the speck out of your eye,' when all the time there is a plank in your own eye?"

But when you say, would a member "be considered judging..." well, considered by whom?  We are advised to be careful and slow to judge and, at the end of our days, we may or may not find that God has been pleased with us....  But if I come along as an individual and say, "Tony, you are being judgmental," isn't that rather like my saying I see a speck of sawdust in your eye? (see the quotation from Matthew Chapter 7 above.)  Hopefully the most deepened of the believers (the most understanding) will see that you are making an effort to be helpful  ;)


Finally, yes, we definitely believe that our actions in this life could have a negative affect on the next life.  We sometimes make an analogy to the embryo and then fetus that is preparing to be born into this world:  if it fails to develop limbs or ears or eyes, it is going to be impaired in this life.  And if, while here, we fail to fully develop our spiritual selves, our "spiritual" arms or legs, or eyes or ears, so to speak, we risk being impaired throughout the next life.  It is therefore crucially important that we find our paths to God, seek His guidance, and do what we can to develop spiritual qualities such as patience, honesty, forbearance  .... in fact we've got a whole list.  See my next post below.



Note:  the entire text of Developing Distinctive Bahá'í Communities may be found online at http://bahai-library.com/index.php5?file=nsa_developing_distinctive_communities.html#15
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Rebecca

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Re: Bahai Values And Morals.
« Reply #8 on: January 22, 2008, 09:01:06 PM »

Among the qualities we should develop (or not, per xii - xxii below) (from the Synopsis and Codification of the Kitáb-i-Aqdas revealed by Bahá'u'lláh):

i. To be truthful

ii. To be trustworthy

iii. To be faithful

iv. To be righteous and fear God

v. To be just and fair

vi. To be tactful and wise

vii. To be courteous

viii. To be hospitable

ix. To be persevering

x. To be detached

xi. To be absolutely submissive to the Will of God

xii. Not to stir up mischief

xiii. Not to be hypocritical

xiv. Not to be proud

xv. Not to be fanatical

xvi. Not to prefer one's self to one's neighbour

xvii. Not to contend with one's neighbour

xviii. Not to indulge one's passions

xix. Not to lament in adversity

xx. Not to contend with those in authority

xxi. Not to lose one's temper

xxii. Not to anger one's neighbour

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Rebecca

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Re: Bahai Values And Morals.
« Reply #9 on: January 24, 2008, 10:46:12 AM »

Dear Tony,

I apologize for having misread the focus of your question and not providing an adequate response.  If, at any future time, you would like to discuss these matters further, I hope you will feel free to raise these questions again.

Thank you for having shared your concerns.  May God also bless you.

Take care

Rebecca
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UDRF

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Re: Bahai Values And Morals.
« Reply #10 on: January 27, 2008, 04:46:25 PM »

Hi Tony,

I'll just add a little to what has been said. I guess I shouldn't even have brought up the concept of "institutional recourse" both because it's not what you asked about and because it's very difficult to give a fitting explanation of such concepts on an internet forum. And as said before it is only rarely used and then only as a very last recourse.

Concerning the idea of helping a brother or sister in spiritual need the answer is not so simple as yes or no. The Bahá'í community is a worldwide one (for example I'm writing from a town in the north of Iceland) and therefore certain aspects of the community life are affected by it's surrounding culture. For instance in Iceland, and Scandinavia in general, people are more, unfortunately, aloof from each other than perhaps in most other cultures, this means that in my country for example, whether you are Christian or Bahá'í, it is not so easy to help others in this direct kind of way without seeming rude. I imagine that the culture in North America is quite different and although I'm loath to express opinion on how people act towards each other in a community I have no direct experience of, my experience of N.A. Bahá'ís has been a very warm and pleasant one.

However, I'll tell you about some things bahá'ís are doing in every part of the world as a means of strengthening their social and religious bonds and in order to effect a spiritual change in the societies in which they are living. These are such simple, yet profound, things as conducting home-visits where they will read and study prayers with each other, learn about the history of the Bahá'í faith and it's spiritual teachings, they participate in study circles with Bahá'ís and non-Bahá'ís alike where they study materials which aim to inculcate a spiritual approach to life and where such skills as the ones already mentioned are taught as well as such skills as conducting spiritual education for children and youth, which in turn attempt to inculcate a moral and spiritual outlook on life. None of the above mentioned materials are authoritarian in nature but rather seek to inspire it's students to use their judgment not only in their evaluation of said materials but also in their evaluation of material concepts and constructs which dismiss an entire aspect of the human being in stride, that is the spiritual nature of humanity.

Now this whole discussion sprang up because of the situation of your ex-girlfriend. I don't know whether or not anyone has tried to talk to her or not or even whether it would be wise for anyone to attempt to do so directly. However I know that the above mentioned aspects of the Bahá'í faith are being especially emphasized in all Bahá'í communities in the world right now and I can further more testify to their transforming power, however, these activities are optional. Two fundamental principles of the bahá'í faith are the absence of proselytizing and the duty of independent search for truth. This does not mean that the Bahá'í community does not offer it's support to those that are in need of it, but the Bahá'í attitude can be summed up in the following quote from the words of Bahá'u'lláh:

"The wise are they that speak not unless they obtain a hearing, even as the cup-bearer, who proffereth not his cup till he findeth a seeker, and the lover who crieth not out from the depths of his heart until he gazeth upon the beauty of his beloved."

As I said before I live in a community where people find it a bit difficult to "meddle" in each others lives which to my mind is both a good and bad thing, but whenever I needed help and whenever I needed comfort I have always been able to seek spiritual solace and motivation from my fellow Bahá'í brothers and sisters.

Best regards,
Jakob
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UDRF

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Re: Bahai Values And Morals.
« Reply #11 on: January 27, 2008, 04:50:46 PM »

That was supposed to be "materialistic concepts and..." not "material"

best regards,
Jakob
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omar

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Re: Bahai Values And Morals.
« Reply #12 on: January 31, 2008, 06:35:52 PM »

The strong clear words Baha'u'llahl spoke about the gay people were not presented in answer to the lesbian question. From HIs Tablets “He who relateth himself to the All-Merciful and committeth satanic deeds, verily he is not of Me. Unto this beareth witness every atom, pebble, tree and fruit, and beyond them this ever-proclaiming, truthful and trustworthy Tongue." http://bahai-library.com/uhj/homosexuality.uhj.html
 
There are many gay Baha’is already and as Bobbi of Enciniats Says says all are welcomed. They are growing and proactive. Their voice in loud within the Bahai community. A new member committing the “satanic” deeds might meet her new partner at a meeting but would never be counseled. In eventually time the gay Baha’is will make the clear words of Baha'u'llah condemning the homosexual acts vanish from the teachings. My question would be why Baha'u'llahl chose the stong word “satanic” and if his word is still important.  The Baha’is who were my friends did not seem concerned with Satan or the afterlife.
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Rebecca

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Re: Bahai Values And Morals.
« Reply #13 on: February 01, 2008, 04:23:38 PM »

Dear Omar and all,

As I definitely find your concerns to be valid and real, I would like to try to address them.  Part of my challenge is that the Writings of Baha'u'llah and the additional guidance that we have are vast, and as a finite and fallible human being, I can only try to offer you an explanation that I hope will be accurate enough and clear enough.  I therefore hope you will bear with me.

1.  Profundity of religious teachings.  In line with what I've just said above, I've previously commented to Tony directly that, as a preliminary matter, I find many religious concepts to be profound and not always easy to explain in simple terms.  Based on my belief that God is Infinite and in fact Unknowable, I don't find this to be surprising.  I hope you won’t mind a quotation in this regard.

Quote
Too high is the All-Merciful for the hearts of those who have recognized Him to apprehend His true nature, or for the minds of men to hope to fathom His essence. He verily is exalted above the understanding of anyone besides Himself, and sanctified beyond the comprehension of all else save Him. From all eternity He hath been independent of the entire creation.
(from the Writings of Baha'u'llah)

Although God is considered to be Exalted above comprehension, still, God seems to have given us people a duty to try to understand as best we can. Some of us definitely try.

2.  Preservation of the teachings.  First, I am inclined to believe that Baha'u'llah's Writings will not be altered or destroyed unless God, in His inscrutable Wisdom, allows it to happen.  Admittedly, God has at times allowed people to do some of the most awful and idiotic things to themselves, each other, and the environment, but at the same time I think all of the Holy Books point to a time when God shall establish His Kingdom on Earth.  I do think God will aid us in preserving the integrity of His Revelation.

Carefully preserved in the Holy Land, Baha'is have original manuscripts and carefully copied and even illuminated versions of our Sacred Texts.  Over time, numerous copies of Baha'u'llah's most important works have been published, so that many of us have them in our homes.  I think it would be quite difficult for anyone to select a particular passage and then make it completely disappear.  Again, we already have the words in our printed publications and you've seen them on the Internet.  Secondly, I have seen no evidence of any particular special interest group "taking over".  The most important emphasis in the Baha'i Writings is that, although the people of the globe are diverse in many ways, diversity is ultimately a good thing and that we must respect and get along with each other.  I think this discourages special interests.

I would have to rely on your comments about what the situation is in your region of California, as I myself am in the Northeastern USA (Massachusetts) and have not so much as visited your region.  I notice that our friend Jakob said he has written us from a town northeast of Iceland.  Here where I live, I am not generally aware of people's sexual issues nor whether anyone may be grappling with homosexuality.  Sure, one or two people have confided in me regarding certain issues or problems, but I suppose as to the others that either nobody is defining themselves as homosexual or that they're being discreet.

3.  Counseling.  I certainly had not ever meant to imply that Baha'is would not counsel each other, nor otherwise do what they can to help each other.  I also did not mean to say that we should go around "reporting" each other's behavior to the "authorities"!  To the contrary.  As with any friend, if I have an opportunity to help another Baha'i, or anyone else for that matter, I certainly will, and I will do it as discreetly as I know how.  Because Baha'i communities tend to be small (or, at least where I am, we are and have been very small), as a practical matter the range of resources (and personalities) is sometimes very limited.

I have found a quotation stating not only that we should help others, but also calling on us to do so with honor, respect and kindness:

Quote
There are souls in the human world who are ignorant; we must make them knowing. Some growing upon the tree are weak and ailing; we must assist them toward health and recovery. If they are as infants in development, we must minister to them until they attain maturity. We should never detest and shun them as objectionable and unworthy. We must treat them with honor, respect and kindness; for God has created them and not Satan. They are not manifestations of the wrath of God but evidences of His divine favor. God, the Creator, has endowed them with physical, mental and spiritual qualities that they may seek to know and do His will; therefore, they are not objects of His wrath and condemnation. In brief, all humanity must be looked upon with love, kindness and respect; for what we behold in them are none other than the signs and traces of God Himself. All are evidences of God; therefore, how shall we be justified in debasing and belittling them, uttering anathema and preventing them from drawing near unto His mercy? This is ignorance and injustice, displeasing to God; for in His sight all are His servants.
(from a talk by 'Abdu'l-Baha, July 14, 1912 at the All Souls Unitarian Church, Fourth Avenue and Twentieth Street, New York)

4.  Gaining the Good-Pleasure of God.  I speak as an individual and certainly cannot claim to know the thoughts of Baha'is that I have not met, but personally I am only too well aware of the warnings that the Writings of Baha'u'llah give, that we should each try to guard ourselves from going astray.

As an example, I have yet another quotation.

Quote
...Ye should perform such deeds as would please God, your Lord, earning thereby the good-pleasure of Him Whom God shall make manifest. Turn not your religion into a means of material gain, spending your life on vanities, and inheriting thereby on the Day of Resurrection that which would displease Him Whom God shall make manifest, while ye deem that what ye do is right. If, however, ye observe piety in your Faith, God will surely nourish you from the treasuries of His heavenly grace. 

Be ye sincere in your allegiance to Him Whom God shall make manifest, for the sake of God, your Lord, that perchance ye may, through devotion to His Faith, be redeemed on the Day of Resurrection. Beware lest ye suffer one another to be wrapt in veils by reason of the disputes which may, during your night, arise among you as a result of the problems ye encounter or in consideration of such matters as your loftiness or lowliness, your nearness or remoteness. 

Thus have We firmly exhorted you—a befitting exhortation indeed—that haply ye may cleave tenaciously unto it and attain thereby salvation on the Day of Resurrection. The time is approaching when ye will be at peace with yourselves in your homes, and lo, Him Whom God shall make manifest will have appeared, and God wisheth you to return unto Him, even as God called you into being through the Primal Point. However, all of you will seek guidance while pursuing the promptings of your own desires. Some of you are filled with pride by reason of your religion, others because of your learning. Ye will, one and all, cling unto some part of the [Book] as a means of self-glorification.
(Selections from the Writings of the Bab, pp. 129-130)


In summary, what I would want to say is that there is a lot of guidance, there are clear directions on how to be and there are warnings not to go astray.  For me, this means I need to watch my own behavior.  What it has meant to me with regard to other people is this:  (a) we all have problems and I should not focus on my neighbor's deficiencies rather than my own; (b) if I see an opportunity to help someone, I do what I can to help in a respectful manner; and (c) if the person I would like to help will not accept my help, out of respect I back off.

Finally, let me suggest that people's having sexual issues, while obviously a problem in today's world that even sometimes leads to certain physical illnesses, does not seem as grave as certain other problems in the world that continue to cause killing and death.  Let me end with another citation to a talk given by 'Abdu'l-Baha in Paris, France, see http://reference.bahai.org/en/t/ab/PT/pt-46.html.

Quote
All prejudices, whether of religion, race, politics or nation, must be renounced, for these prejudices have caused the world’s sickness. It is a grave malady which, unless arrested, is capable of causing the destruction of the whole human race. Every ruinous war, with its terrible bloodshed and misery, has been caused by one or other of these prejudices.  ...


I hope the above comments will be helpful.

Best wishes,

Rebecca


Oh dear, and not meaning to miss your question:

Why Baha'u'llah chose the strong word “satanic”:  I can't claim to know the answer to that one.

Whether His word is still important, yes, personally I believe it is.  Therefore I do think that we have to take sexual issues seriously (note, the passage you quoted refers to "adultery, sodomy and lechery").  For me, again, this means I need to watch my own behavior.  And if I can help another person, I would be pleased to do so.


Note:  All quotations are copyrighted by the Baha'i International Community.
« Last Edit: February 01, 2008, 04:33:51 PM by Rebecca »
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TonyC.

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Re: Bahai Values And Morals.
« Reply #14 on: February 04, 2008, 12:08:03 AM »

Thanks you for your time and thoughts.. I’m glad all Baha’is aren’t as un talkative as the North County Community that started this “discussion” forum. .A couple more questions I hope could be answered simply with personal opinions. (and not so many citations).

1. Do you think it’s possible to be  a practicing lesbian and a good Bahai.

2. Do you  think it would be possible for a lesbian couple “ become fully united both spiritually and physically, so that they may attain eternal union throughout all the worlds of God, and improve the spiritual life of each other.” (Abdu’l-Bahá, Bahá’í World Faith - Abdu’l-Bahá Section, p. 372)

3. Do you think being a practicing lesbian would have negative effects on a souls afterlife?
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